Citizenship

Whose citizens? Kosovan Serbs between Kosovo, Serbia and Russia

Gezim Krasniqi
A never-ending tunnel

Serbs in the northern part of Kosovo remain trapped in a political dispute between Pristina and BelgradAlthough both Pristina and Belgrade treat them as their respective citizens, they were included in neither the Kosovo organised census in spring 2011, nor the one organised by Serbia in autumn 2011. While they boycotted the first one (unlike Serbs living south of Mitrovica and other minorities), Serbs from the northern part of Kosovo were left out of the Serb census. This certainly has strengthened the feeling of isolation and abandonment among this community. Therefore, the demand for Russian citizenship should be seen in this context.

(Also available at www.eudo-citizenship.eu)

On Citizenship and Donkeys in Cyprus

Nikos Skoutaris
'Who is a Cypriot'

The turbulent history of the Cyprus issue has influenced the understanding of the concept of Cypriot citizenship(s). In that sense, the fate of this concept is tied with the fate of the current bi-communal negotiations, at the end of which we should know whether the two communities agree on the answer to the question of who is a Cypriot, apart from the donkeys…

One of the most famous aphorisms attributed to Rauf Denktash, the historical leader of the Turkish Cypriot community, is that ‘the only real Cypriots residing on the island are the donkeys’. Despite its provocative manner, such a statement reveals how controversial it might be in the context of the Cyprus conflict to attempt to define ‘who is a Cypriot’.

Europeanise.me – Montenegro changes its citizenship law

Jelena Džankić
A long road to the EU

Along with the adoption of the Election Law in September 2011, the process of Europeanisation (through EU’s political conditionality) has also yielded a change in Montenegro’s citizenship legislation, resulting in a facilitated naturalisation for citizens of the former Yugoslav republics.

When Montenegro received its candidate country status in November 2010, the European Commission (EC) recommended that the country fulfil seven conditions before opening accession talks. The requirement that topped the EC’s list was the need to adopt a new Election Law.

The Past of Central Europe is the Future of Europe, an interview with Zygmunt Bauman

A brighter future for Europe?

Whenever Rome conquered a new territory, not only its residents were granted Roman citizenship, but the statues of their local gods were added to the imperial Pantheon. The frame of thought behind such a strategy was kept alive through part of the modern era in parts of Central Europe which stayed away from the west-European religious wars, nation-state building and Westphalian settlement. One can suppose today that the past of Central Europe is the future of an increasingly diasporic Europe…

Interview with Zygmunt Bauman conducted by Igor Stiks

How do you see the direction of contemporary transformations of modern citizenship?

Srebrenica’s citizens: home and abroad

Lara J. Nettelfield
Sarah Wagner
Digging new graves in Srebrenica

We often think of citizenship in terms of passports and polling stations, but the rights and responsibilities inherent in belonging to a nation-state often take on more mundane, at times unexpected, forms. This is especially true in post-conflict nations, where citizens shoulder much of the burden of rebuilding society in the context of their everyday lives. The aftermath of the Srebrenica genocide provides a compelling example of this work. Citizens, both at home and abroad, have struggled to reconstitute their families, homes, and communities.

We often think of citizenship in terms of passports and polling stations, but the rights and responsibilities inherent in belonging to a nation-state often take on more mundane, at times unexpected, forms. This is especially true in post-conflict nations, where citizens shoulder much of the burden of rebuilding society in the context of their everyday lives.

The Other Europe 20 Years Later, an interview with Jacques Rupnik

A boat with no direction?

Jacques Rupnik, professor at the Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po), on unfinished states, hollow democracies in Eastern Europe, and EU enlargement.

Interview with Jacques Rupnik conducted by Igor Stiks and Gëzim Krasniqi

Cities and Citizenship, an interview with David Harvey

City and citizens

I would prefer to disaggregate the idea of citizenship. I always felt that wherever I went I sort of carried a notion of citizenship with me no matter where I was and no matter what city I was staying in. I always felt that I was a citizen of that city. And I think actually this is kind of a nice feeling because you feel like you belong anywhere and I think it would be a great idea if cities would declare themselves free zones of citizenship.

Interview with David Harvey conducted by Igor Stiks

What, in your opinion, does it mean to be a citizen today? Citizenship is generally related to states, but most of the population of these states live in cities.

What it did not say: Secession after the ICJ's opinion on Kosovo

Gëzim Krasniqi
ICJ building

A summary of the legal and political debates on the ICJ Advisory Opinion on Kosovo

The much-anticipated opinion of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on the legality of Kosovo’s declaration of independence (DoI) caught many by surprise for its clear answer, yet it failed to declare itself on essential issues such as Kosovo’s right to statehood as well as the right of its peo

Imagining the nation in Serbia

Jelena Vasiljević
Graffitis in Belgrade

The changing citizenship regimes in Serbia illustrate the ways in which various narratives of nationhood run parallel to political changes, at times reinforcing them, at times creating obstacles for their implementation, but nevertheless providing a means by which they may be interpreted.

This is an extended summary of a longer paper that was originally published in the CITSEE Working Paper Series and is available for download here.

The Janus face of Slovenian Citizenship

Tomaž Deželan
A statue on a Ljubljana bridge

The citizenship regime in Slovenia can seem to have two faces. For those who focus on its numerous malfunctions, the citizenship regime seems xenophobic, even apartheid-like. By contrast, those who focus on the initial determination characterise the system as progressive and civic.

This is an extended summary of a longer paper that was originally published in the CITSEE Working Paper Series and is available for download here.

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