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Subversive Citizens and Urban Battlefields

subversive citizens

In an interview with Open Citizenship, Srećko Horvat and CITSEE member Igor Štiks spoke about their work on the Subversive Festival in Zagreb and what it means for the city of Zagreb and urban citizenship in general, as well as about the complexities of subversion and activism today in Europe.

In an interview with Open Citizenship, Srećko Horvat and CITSEE member Igor Štiks spoke about their work on the Subversive Festival in Zagreb and what it means for the city of Zagreb and urban citizenship in general,

When counting counts. The Bosnian Census

Florian Bieber
Bosnian census

Nobody knows how many people live in Bosnia. The numbers given suggest around 3.8 million, but these are at best estimates. As a result, one does not really know that GDP per capita and other crucial data cannot be determined without the population size. In addition, the specific numbers across the country might correct some misconceptions. Generally speaking, one would except a trend in urbanisation as a result of the war and the post-war period as poor rural areas have been abandoned. Yet the cities might have not grown as much as some expect. 

This piece originally appeared in the authors personal blog.

Utopias of Democracy -– 6th Subversive Festival in Zagreb, Croatia

Sara Valenzuela Borken-Hage
6th Subversive Festival

At a time when the crisis of the Euro and the doubts about the viability of the EU are deepening, South Eastern Europe continues to be centre of the crisis, the open wound; a visual reminder of the flawed dynamics that rule the collective psyches of Europe and those in control [of it]. In lieu of this, Subversive recognises the importance of this discussion and the creation of a common understanding amongst social movements at this particular moment in time.

This article originally appeared in Bturn magazine in a slightly modified version

Serbia-Kosovo agreement: political breakthrough or jobs for the boys?

Eric Gordy
Mitrovica Bridge

The widely hailed agreement reached between Serbia and Kosovo entrenches the power of clientelistic elites and is no real cause for celebration argues Eric Gordy.

This piece originally appeared in UCL SSEES Research Blog

UK migration policy: we need to talk about citizens

Nando Sigona
UKBA

The family rules introduced by the UK government as part of its crusade to curb net migration are surreptitiously redefining the meaning of citizenship and the boundaries between the state and its subjects.

This piece originally appeared in Open Democracy digital commons. 

Team Building

Peter Geoghegan
albanian football

A former province of Serbia, Kosovo does not have a fully-fledged national team of its own. Despite the 2008 declaration of independence being recognised by over 90 countries, Kosovo is not been allowed to apply for membership of FIFA or UEFA. For Kosovan players and fans alike, the makeshift Kosovo national side that has played a handful of low-key matches against the likes of Monaco and Saudi Arabia is no substitute for competitive international football.

A recent match between Switzerland and Albania included players whose home nation is not yet recognised by FIFA

Europe, 'Kill Bill' Style

Iker Barbero
Europe, 'Kill Bill Style'

Within Europe there is much talk of the 'other' at both national and supranational levels. While Europe seeks to strengthen its borders, some political parties have tried to capitalise on the fears of their electorates. Recently, a European Commission video that was supposed to promote the EU enlargement (targeting domestic audiences but also those of candidate countries in Southeast Europe) has proven controversial in its depictions of otherness. Iker Barbero discusses the issue in his Oecumene blog, reposted by CITSEE

(Also available at http://www.oecumene.eu/blog/europe-kill-bill-style)

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