Croatia

Croatia

Subversive Forum: What is the future of Europe and its citizens?

Nick Holdstock
Subversive Forum

The 5th Zagreb Subversive Festival included the Subversive Film Festival, an international conference named The Future of Europe at which leading stars of the local and international intellectual and activist scene will gather, such as Slavoj Žižek, Samir Amin, Tariq Ali, G.C. Spivak, Michael Hardt, Gianni Vattim, Stéphane Hessel, the Subversive Forum – a platform for alternative social mobilization, and the Balkan Forum in which over forty organisations, trade unions and individuals will come together in an attempt to lay the foundations for future collaboration and networking in both European and worldwide movements with the aim of further integration.

 

Nick Holdstock attended the Subversive Forum in Zagreb from May 13th-May 18th. In the following piece he revisits some of the themes and questions that this gathering of intellectuals, academics and activists considered during the Forum.

The European Crisis

Another Decade of Roma Exclusion?

Marginalisation

Though many states continue to emphasise their commitment to improving the Roma’s live, it remains difficult to assess the success of many of these initiatives, as there is usually poor monitoring of these projects’ outcomes.

The constitutions of most European countries contain some form of commitment to ensuring the rights of minorities, as do the laws of supranational bodies such as the European Union and the United Nations.

Frontex in the Balkans – security before human rights?

Security before human rights?

Even the most rigorous attempts at enforcing the EU’s borders are unlikely to prevent illegal immigration. The issue thus cannot simply be one of security and enforcement, but also how to ensure the welfare of migrants in a way that promotes social cohesion.

The notion of a Europe with increasingly porous internal borders (due to the Schengen agreement and limited visa liberalisation) has gone hand in hand with increased attempts to control

Towards Post-Territorial Citizenship?

Francesco Ragazzi
Bridging

Today citizenship is largely distributed amongst the ‘diaspora’, ministries and governmental agencies are dedicated to relations with co-ethnics abroad (who are often their citizens) and citizens abroad are increasingly included in votes for parliamentary and presidential elections. But this has not always been the case.

“The [June] elections were historical because Macedonians living abroad were given a chance to vote for a candidate to represent them, and also because they were conducted without one incident,” said Pavle Sazdov, who was elected in June and appointed as MP to represent Macedonia’s diaspora,

New Diaspora Politics in Serbia and Croatia

Updated version
Which direction? Diaspora politics in Serbia and Croatia

The issue of defining the rights of those in diaspora is (again) under discussion in Croatia and Serbia.

States are expected to be responsible for the well-being of the citizens on a variety of levels, even when they are outside the borders of the state e.g. if they have problems when visiting another country.

Defining the nation: constructing citizenship in the new Croatia

Viktor Koska
Old Zagreb

The Croatian citizenship legislation reveals the ongoing process of Croatian invention of, in the words of Rogers Brubaker, ‘the tradition of nationhood’ which is based on the idea that the Croatian state is a product of the “centennial” aspirations of the ethnic Croat community to have its own national state.

This is an extended summary of a longer paper that was originally published in the CITSEE Working Paper Series and is available for download here.

Croatia

Papers

Country Report by Igor Štiks and Francesco Ragazzi

 

Links

Syndicate content