Bosnia-Herzegovina

Bosnia-Herzegovina

The Art of Political Crisis: Can we Compare Belgium and Bosnia?

Eldar Sarajlic
Bosnia and Belgium

The recent political crises in Belgium and Bosnia and Herzegovina have made this comparison particularly apposite. Both countries have broken the existing records for the time it took their political elites to form a government after the general elections. The Belgian elections took place in June 2010; the government was formed in early December 2011. The Bosnian elections took place in October 2010; the government was formed only in late December 2011. However, both countries have gone through a serious political crisis that at times threatened the stability of their respective political systems. Scenarios of dissolution for both countries became more than hypothetical models.

Since Bosnia and Herzegovina’s creation as a consociational state in 1995, the parallels between it and Belgium have been striking.

Bosnia’s third citizens: a story of Brčko’s exception

Dejan Stjepanović
Bosnia's three pillars

The citizenship regime in Brčko and BiH today is a product of a complex peace settlement. BiH has a two-tiered system of citizenship, in some ways similar to the former Yugoslav or even European citizenship regime. Citizens of BiH are by rule citizens of either of the entities, the Federation of BiH or Republika Srpska. However, the Brčko District, a de facto third entity with matching competencies of the entities, lacks its own citizenship.

 “Orciny’s the third city. It’s between the other two. It’s in the dissensi, disputed zones, places that Besźel thinks are Ul Qoma’s and Ul Qoma Besźel’s. When the old commune split, it did not split into two, it split into three.”

Another Decade of Roma Exclusion?

Marginalisation

Though many states continue to emphasise their commitment to improving the Roma’s live, it remains difficult to assess the success of many of these initiatives, as there is usually poor monitoring of these projects’ outcomes.

The constitutions of most European countries contain some form of commitment to ensuring the rights of minorities, as do the laws of supranational bodies such as the European Union and the United Nations.

Srebrenica’s citizens: home and abroad

Lara J. Nettelfield
Sarah Wagner
Digging new graves in Srebrenica

We often think of citizenship in terms of passports and polling stations, but the rights and responsibilities inherent in belonging to a nation-state often take on more mundane, at times unexpected, forms. This is especially true in post-conflict nations, where citizens shoulder much of the burden of rebuilding society in the context of their everyday lives. The aftermath of the Srebrenica genocide provides a compelling example of this work. Citizens, both at home and abroad, have struggled to reconstitute their families, homes, and communities.

We often think of citizenship in terms of passports and polling stations, but the rights and responsibilities inherent in belonging to a nation-state often take on more mundane, at times unexpected, forms. This is especially true in post-conflict nations, where citizens shoulder much of the burden of rebuilding society in the context of their everyday lives.

Escaping the Balkans? After visa liberalisation

A reflection of stop sign; a photo by Alf Thomas

The rise in asylum seekers following visa liberalisation in the Western Balkans.

The EU accession process has brought a variety of changes to citizens of the Western Balkans, perhaps the greatest of which has been the easing of visa restrictions.

Bosnia: Complex Citizenship in a Complex Country

Eldar Sarajlić
A view of Sarajevo

Today’s Bosnia and Herzegovina has a complex citizenship regime. It emerged as a response to instability at a particular point in the country’s history, which then became established as the dominant pattern of political interaction.  

This is an extended summary of a longer paper that was originally published in the CITSEE Working Paper Series and is available for download here.

From the inside out. Understanding citizenship through fiction

Andrew Wachtel
A reflection; a photo by Alf Thomas

Can literature deepen our appreciation of citizenship? Insofar as literary works touch on the question of how individuals imagine their relationship to a community, be it strictly speaking political/legal, or more generally, they can allow us to understand attitudes toward citizenship. 

This is an extended summary of a longer paper that was originally published  in the CITSEE Working Paper Series and is available for download here.<

Bosnia-Herzegovina

Papers 

Country Report by Eldar Sarajlić

 

Links

Syndicate content